Ingen Hunters (CB-Topps)

HunterPeter Ludlow hired a team of hunters in his expedition to attempt to extract dinosaurs from Isla Sorna. They traveled to the island along with Ludlow via Ingen Helicopters, which carried all of their gear. Leading the Hunters was Roland Tembo, with Ajay Sidhu as his second in command. The Hunters utilized ATV Jeeps, Humvees, and Capture Trucks to pursue the dinosaurs along the game trail.

After restraining the dinosaurs, they utilized snares to bring them down, and cattle prods to shock them into submission. They were all equipped with Tranquilizer rifles for bringing the larger animals down as well as hunting rifles.  There were a large number of hunters, at least twenty.

The hunters were scattered as the Tyrannosaurus pair attacked their camp. Since they were caught sleeping, they were too disorganized to do anything other then run. In panic, the Ingen Hunters ran straight into the long grass, which was the hunting grounds of the Velociraptors.  The raptors proceeded to kill almost all of the hunters in this fatal ambush.

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Gorilla (CB-Topps)

The Gorilla was transplanted into the Jungles of Columbia by Dr. Belvedere for sGorillatudy with Biosyn funding.The Gorilla quickly comes across the escaped raptors, and engages with them in a fight. A team led by Alan Grant, Robert Muldoon, Ellie Sattler, and Ian Malcolm to track the raptors is interrupted when they spot the Gorilla. However, upon landing, the Gorilla abducts Ellie. However, it soon releases her as the raptors approach it, engaging into another fight with the pair of raptors, which ends in its death as it falls off a cliff.

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Hunter’s Camp (CB-Topps)

The Hunters in the InGen expedition to Isla Sorna set up camp in a large clearing. The camp was protected by laser barriers in order to secure the perimeter. The hunters kept their captured animals such as Triceratops, Stegosaurus, and Compsognathus in animal cages throughout the camp. There were also multiple cargo crates, for the storage and handling of various equipment to be used in the extraction and transportation of animals.

Peter Ludlow set up television equipment in the camp, along with a model of JP San Diego in order to display to his investors on the mainland that his dream was a reality by showing them the finished products. There were multiple tents in the campsite where the hunters camped overnight while they waited for the morning.

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Michael Jeter

8763-25445Michael Jeter was an American film actor born August 26th, 1952 and passed away in March 30th of 2003. During his life, Jeter won a Tony Award for his role in the Broadway musical Grand Hotel and an an Emmy for his television role in the sitcom Evening Shade.

Biography

Born August 26th, 1952 in Lawrence, Tennessee to Virginia and William Jeter, Michael grew up with five other siblings; a brother and four sisters. While studying medicine at Memphis State University (now University of Memphis), Jeter switched his focus to acting and began performing in the Circuit theater and the Playhouse Theater. Jeter eventually left Memphis for Boston to further his career. In his many roles, Jeter won a Tony in 1990 and an Emmy in 1992. Jeter was also a favorite with younger audiences with his role on Sesame Street as “Mr. Noodle”, the brother of “Mr. Noodle” from 1999 til his death in 2003. Michael was found dead in his Hollywood home at the age of 50 following a public battle with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. He was cremated and his ashes spread. Despite having HIV, Jeter’s partner, Sean Blue, stated publicly that Jeter had died of an epileptic seizure. Jeter’s final film, The Polar Express, was dedicated to his memory.

Selected Filmography

  • The Money Pit (1986)
  • Tango and Cash (1989)
  • Waterworld (1995)
  • Mouse Hunt (1997)
  • The Green Mile (1999)
  • Jurassic Park /// (2001)
  • Open Range (2003)
  • The Polar Express (2004)

Work for Jurassic Park ///

For the third Jurassic Park film, director Joe Johnston cast Michael Jeter for the role of Udesky, a booking agent who helped Paul Kirby (William H. Macy) and Amanda Kirby (Tea Leoni) find their missing son, Eric, who had crash landed on Isla Sorna during a parasailing trip.

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San Diego (CB-Topps)

San Diego is a large city located in southern California. It is a port city, as well as a naval town. It was through this port that Peter Ludlow held a publicity reception at the main customs dock to advertise the arrival of the captured Tyrannosaurus aboard the S.S. Venture. This reception was gated and well attended by security, and Ludlow held the reception at the far end of the dock.

This dock was later destroyed as the Tyrannosaurus had killed all personal on board, and the S.S Venture crashed into the dock. As the Tyrannosaur rampaged through downtown San Diego, it smashed various vehicles as well during its rampage and terrorized the citizens of San Diego. It eventually attracted a retinue of police helicopters as well.

In San Diego, there was also the construction site for Jurassic Park: San Diego. It was only partially completed, and the only animal housed in it during the time of the San Diego incident was the juvenile Tyrannosaur. Security was not very tight at the construction site as only two security guards were seen.

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Rafael’s Mansion and Compound (CB-Topps)

The drug lord Rafael Santos, had his own private compound deep in the Columbian Rainforest. This compound was guarded by his personal guards, as well as animal trainers to handle the captured Velociraptors. Rafael kept Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler hostage in the mansion, while the raptors were housed initially in a large glass dome intended as a containment system.

The Mansion itself was quite luxurious, although only small parts of it are seen. The room Alan Grant woke up in was equipped with television and video camera which was utilized to send messages across the building. This video system was tied into his security teamm, which fed him and his guards simultaneous video streams from around his compound for added security.

The room Grant woke up in was equipped with a bed, as well as an end table for its furniture. Grant himself had a cast on, and a cane was provided to help him walk better. Down the hallway there was a window which allowed visitors to observe the raptors in the glass dome, which was obscured by curtains. There was also an Aquarium in this hallway. Ellie was also injured, and thus was provided with a sling by Rafael’s men.

In his compound bunker, Rafael housed the raptors also in large animal cages. The raptors themselves were outfitted with electrified collars, which could be attached to chains. The compound was surrounded by heavy fencing, and was guarded by men carrying Assault Rifles. The raptors were partially subdued through the use of tranquilizing gas, and the guards utilized gas masks to avoid the after-effects. In addition, a bulldozer can also be seen around the compound.

The pit in which the raptors were contained had a lawn chair so that Rafael could observe the raptors from a safe height. There were also straw dummies for the raptors to be utilized on for attack practice. These dummies were outfitted with an ‘I <3 NY’ T-shirt and a BDU cap as well.

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Christopher Swift

Christopher Swift is a Special EffectsChris Swift Character Creator, Makeup Effects Artist, Supervisor for Legacy Effects, and Teacher at Stan Winston School of Character Arts. Swift was born in Las Vegas, Nevada and was a self-taught artist. After creating the special effects for his own short films, Swift chose it for his professional career. Swift began a career at Stan Winston Studio with his first project there being the 1991 film, Termminator 2: Judgment Day. At Stan Winston Studio, Swift became a Key Artist and character designer. He continues to work at Legacy Effects, formerly Stan Winston Studio. Swift contributed to the creation of the animatronic Velociraptors in the first Jurassic Park film and other animatronics for The Lost World: Jurassic Park and Jurassic Park III.

Selected Filmography

  • Child’s Play (1988)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Batman Returns (1992)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Congo (1995)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Jurassic Park III (2001)
  • Charlotte’s Web (2006)
  • Iron Man (2008)
  • Avatar (2009)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Cowboys and Aliens (2011)
  • Life of Pi (2012)
  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Pacific Rim (2013)

Works Cited – Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

 

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Biosyn Headquarters (CB-Topps)

Biosyn Headquarters (Comics)The headquarters for Biosyn Genetic Engineering were located in Cupertino California. It was surrounded by a chain-link fence which encircled the compound. An Ingen Espionage team sneaked into the facility and planted a high-end explosive device to cause an explosion in retaliation for Bioysn’s sabotage of Isla Nublar. Biosyn Security gaurds attempted to rebuff them, and the two forces engaged in a gunfight which allowed for the Ingen team to stall until the bomb went off.

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John Rosengrant

JohnJohn Rosengrant Rosengrant is an Academy Award nominated Character Creator and teacher at Stan Winston School of Character Arts as well as a Co-Founder of Legacy Effects. Rosengrant majored in Fine Arts at Louisiana State University and moved to Los Angeles in 1983 to pursue a career in special effects. In Los Angeles, he joined Stan Winston Studio where he worked on film projects such as the Terminator franchise, Aliens, and Predator. Rosengrant was a special effects supervisor for the Jurassic Park films and specifically worked on the Male Tyrannosaurus animatronic in both the Lost World: Jurassic Park and Jurassic Park III. After the passing of Stan Winston in 2008, Rosengrant, along with Shane Mahan, Lindsay Macgowan, and Alan Scott, founded Legacy Effects.

Selected Filmography

  • The Terminator (1984)
  • Aliens (1986)
  • Predator (1987)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Congo (1995)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Small Soldiers (1998)
  • The Sixth Sense (1999)
  • Pearl Harbor (2001)
  • Jurassic Park III (2001)
  • Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003)
  • Iron Man (2008)
  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)
  • Avatar (2009)
  • Real Steel (2011)
  • The Hunger Games (2012)
  • The Avengers (2012)
  • Pacific Rim (2013)
  • Jurassic World (2015)

Works Cited- Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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George Lawala’s Cargo Plane (CB-Topps)

PlaneGeorge Lawala utilized a two-pilot Cargo Plane to transport himself and his supplies to Isla Nublar. It was spacious enough to hold several Cargo Cages, in which Alan Grant and Ellie Sattler were contained as well as several captured Velociraptors.These cages were fastened by chains which were locked. In addition, the plane contained a large amount of wooden crates, in which other supplies were kept. A rope and pulley system existed on the plane, to assist in maneuvering the crates.

Additional supplies on the plane included raptor bags, which were used to contain the raptors while they were being loaded onto the ship. Also, included were several shotguns and rifles for use in subduing animals, with flashlights so to be able to see what he was stalking. Lawala also kept a tranquilizing spray, so to be able to keep the raptors at bay. After the Velociraptors killed the crew of the plane, Alan and Ellie managed to crash land the plane in Columbia.

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Telescopic Shock Prod (S/F)

DieterTaserDuring the 1997 InGen expedition to Isla Sorna to harvest Dinosaurs, one of the lead hunters, Dieter Stark, brought with him a collapsible shock prod, like a cattle prod only with a telescoping shaft. The shock prod was first seen when Dieter brought it out after a curious Compsognathus hissed at him on the outskirts of a game trail. Dr. Robert Burke, who had been nearby, rushed over to inspect the small theropod. Dieter remarked the animals’ lack of fear, which Dr. Burke explained was the lack of human presence on the island. In response, Dieter shocked the Compsognathus, then quipping that the small creature now feared humans.

While hiking to the Worker Village, Dieter Stark took the time during a fifteen minute break to relieve himself in the bush. However, before he got a chance to relieve himself, Dieter encountered another Compsognathus. Out of amusement, Dieter began trying to shock the small dinosaur, but missed in all attempts. Soon Dieter realized he had lost his way, and while trying to find the rest of the group he fell down a hill and the shock prod was lost.

The prod itself was sectioned in four pieces. The hand grip, with a boxy control at the middle, allowed for one-handed wielding, and the battery kept enough charge for multiple discharges. The telescopic shaft of the prod had three collapsing sections, the bottommost holding rest of the prod when collapsed and the topmost ending in a metal two-prong fork. The charge was low, and the delivered electrocution was nonlethal, although did cause noticeable pain.

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Montana (CB-Topps)

Chinook Helicopter at Landing Pad.

Chinook Helicopter at Landing Pad.

Alan Grant held an excavation in Montana that was funded by John Hammond. He was assisted by Ellie Sattler, as well as several paleontological dig volunteers.  The dig area was large, with a base camp and helicopter landing pads designated in the area. The terrain of the dig site was a rocky and canyon-like area, which required jeeps to navigate through.

Excavating the Tenotosaurus

Excavating the Tenotosaurus

The site centered around a few ongoing fossil excavations, including a Tenotosaurus, and a Velociraptor, which were both partially complete. In uncovering the fossils, the paleontologists used digging tools such as brushes and picks to chip away at the delicate fossils from the rock matrix. For fossils that were more delicate, they used a imaging system with the use of a ‘thumper,’ which shot a radar pellet into the ground, which would be picked up by the computer at the base.

The base camp was designated by a series of tents, in which several important pieces of equipment including the computers were stored. They housed several baTrailerrrels, and generators to help run the computers and other electrical equipment. At the base camp, was a mobile trailer which served a dual function also as a laboratory for the scientists.

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Gary Rydstrom

Gary Rydstrom is a seven-time Gary RydstromAcademy Award winning sound designer. Rydstrom was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1959. In 1981, he graduated from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Two years later, he was hired at Skywalker Sound where he worked with Ben Burtt, the sound designer for both the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises. For his first project, Rydstrom was a sound technician for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. In 1991, Rydstrom won an Academy Award for his original sound effects for the film, Terminator 2: Judgment Day. In 1993, Rydstrom was tasked to create sounds for the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. He and his team recorded numerous types of animals and mixed the sounds together in order to create realistic sounds for the dinosaurs in the film. He has since worked on numerous film projects. In 2006, Rydstrom directed his first film. It was a Pixar animated short called Lifted. For this, he was nominated for his fourteenth Academy Award. Currently, he is also the English language director for the Japanese animation company Studio Ghibli. Rydstrom has won a Motion Picture Sound Editors lifetime achievement award for his work.

Selected Filmography

  • Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)
  • Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985)
  • Spaceballs (1987)
  • Willow (1988)
  • Ghostbusters II (1989)
  • Backdraft (1991)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Toy Story (1995)
  • Mission Impossible (1996)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Saving Private Ryan (1998)
  • X-Men (2000)
  • Star Wars: Episode II-Attack of the Clones (2002)
  • Lifted (2006)
  • Super 8 (2011)
  • The Adventures of Tintin (2011)
  • Lincoln (2012)
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Eddie’s Garage (CB-Topps)

Eddie's GarageEddie Carr was a field equipment expert who operated from his Mobile Fields Systems Warehouse. It was here that he modified and stored various equipment that he had obtained or was working on.  His inventory included satellite phones, and shop computers. He procured the High Hide, which was a cage on top of a scaffold, intended to keep researchers out of harm’s way. He also stored and modified various vehicles for the expedition to Isla Sorna. These included the Mobile Lab RV Trailers, and two of the Mercedes M-Class vehicles. The trailers and the rest of the equipment would later be transported to Isla Sorna via a vehicle hauling boat.

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Shane Mahan

Shane Mahan is an Academy Award Shane Mahannominated makeup and special effects artist at Legacy Effects, formerly Stan Winston Studio. He was born in Greenville, Michigan. In 1981, after graduating from the local high school, Mahan moved to Hollywood during the makeup and character effects boom of the time. Mahan began working at various effects studios and eventually was hired on at Stan Winston Studio. His first job was key sculptor for the 1984 film, The Terminator. This began a lifelong relationship with the top filmmakers in Hollywood. From here, Mahan worked on numerous other film projects. Mahan was also co-producer of HBO’s Creature Features where he also designed and coordinated creature effects. After working for at Stan Winston Studio for over twenty years, Mahan, along with Alan Scott, John Rosengrant, and Lindsay Mcgowan, founded Legacy Effects after the passing of Stan Winston.

Selected Filmography

  • The Terminator (1984)
  • Aliens (1986)
  • Predator (1987)
  • Predator 2 (1990)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Congo (1995)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Inspector Gadget (1999)
  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • War of the Worlds (2005)
  • Iron Man (2008)
  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)
  • Terminator Salvation (2009)
  • G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (2009)
  • Iron Man 2 (2010)
  • Thor (2011)
  • Cowboys and Aliens (2011)
  • The Avengers (2012)
  • Life of Pi (2012)
  • Iron Man 3 (2013)
  • Pacific Rim (2013)

Works Cited- Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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Hammond’s Residence (CB-Topps)

Hammond's roomJohn Hammond resided in a lavish Park Avenue apartment, although he was confined to his bedroom. In his bedroom, Hammond was hooked up to medical equipment to monitor his condition. He also had a desktop computer from which he was able to monitor the animals of Isla Sorna. Frequent visitors to the apartment included   Ian Malcolm and Peter Ludlow.

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Male Tyrannosaurs rex Animatronic

012For the film The Lost World: Jurassic Park, the number of Tyrannosaurus characters on the set compared to Jurassic Park would become tripled, one of the characters being a fully grown representation of a male. The same animatronic would be reused in Jurassic Park /// in the infamous duel with the Spinosaurus animatronic, where the T. rex animatronic would be destroyed in the fight.

Design

579306_235320459946827_859239382_nTaking inspiration from nature, John Rosengrant colorized old Jurassic Park line-art from Mark McCreery of a male counterpart to the female Tyrannosaurus rex. Main concerns from Shane Mahan was that the color could be drowned out in night sequences, which a majority of the Tyrannosaurus‘ scenes would take place in. Eventually, a mottled green base coloration was $T2eC16ZHJIMFHJY5V-37BSPMgBbtmQ~~60_3supplemented with dark and yellow striping on the upper contours–along the spine–with whitish or cream underbelly. To further the sexual dimorphism between the two genders, alterations to the head and neck design were made. A total of eight different design choices were presented by Shane Mahan to director Steven Spielberg for the latter’s approval. The final chosen design included a neck wattle, bonier face, and a scarred muzzle.

Animatronic

rexskinningInstead of designing a whole new mold for the male, additions were made to the original epoxy of the Jurassic Park Tyrannosaurus mold in order to cast the new skull. Because of budget issues as well as cinematic preference, it was deemed more economic to construct the Tyrannosaurus from the thigh and up, as a majority of the shots of the animatronic during the filming of the first movie did not show the tail or lower legs. Just as with the animatronic from the previous film, the male robotic was controlled via a telemetry device, which gave the crew better control of the armature. However, unlike the animatronic from the previous film, the rex was built on a cart that ran along an eighty foot long track, on which the 18,000 pound animatronic could travel between five and eight miles per hour. On the cart, the animatronic could rear up to twenty feet in height and stretch out to thirty-seven feet long. Because of the size of the animatronics, they were incapable of being moved from their track once on set, and so the set had to be built around it.

rexstageLearning from past mistakes, Stan Winston Studios created a foam rubber skin coated with silicone rather than a pure foam latex skin. This better waterproofed the skin–an issue during the first film–for the trailer sequence, which occurred during a torrential downpour. The animatronic was also required to interact with a stunt double, requiring the need for precision and delicacy–for the safety of the actor–to go along with a professionally done exterior and machinery. During a sequence in which the T. rex would have to rip Eddie Carr (Richard Schiff) out of his SUV, a specially designed suit was made for Schiff’s double to be worn during the shot. The animatronic had the capability to easy kill a human being if it were to malfunction or did not have the requisite finesse. Stan Winston made special note of this to the crew during the trailer sequence preparations.

Use in Jurassic Park ///

JP3RoboRexBecause of the minimal role that Tyrannosaurus would play in the third Jurassic Park film, there was no need to build a new animatronic. Instead, the male animatronic from The Lost World: Jurassic Park was brought out of storage, the skin repainted in a lighter green color in order to represent a purported sub-adult individual. Because the Spinosaurus versus T. rex fight was the final scene filmed with the Spinosaurus animatronic, the Stan Winston Studios crew decided to go all out in the battle. The crew had the puppets act out as if they were fighting a real battle. However, during the fight, the Spinosaurus‘ superior powerful hydraulics literally allowed the Spinosaurus to behead the Tyrannosaurus animatronic with a single swipe from the Spinosaurus‘ clawed arm.

Sound Mixing

angrydaddyIn The Lost World: Jurassic Park, Gary Rydstrom and the sound effects team sourced from different animals to make the male Tyrannosaurus roar deeper than the females. Sounds for the male included, pigs and some other “weird Costa Rican mammals that [they] didn’t even know what they are.” Instead of using the baby elephant rumbles and squeaks that was the base for the female rex bellow (and continued to be the base for the female in TLW), the male’s roar are made up of all “baby elephant-like” sound recordings that were twisted to mimic the sounds of the females roar. However, the rest of the roars that were mixed into the T. rex vocalizations were the same for both genders (tiger, alligator, and dog vocals).

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Velociraptor Practical Effects (TLW)

252475_160313317369671_4544227_nFor The Lost World: Jurassic Park, five total practical effects were created by Stan Winston Studios to be used to bring the “raptor” to life. Along with three, fully animatronic rigs, an animatronic head and torso, and a pair of mechanized wearable legs for shots of the feet, were crafted for use in the film’s production. These animatronics, along with ILM’s CGI representations, would be used in two scenes: The Long Grass massacre, and the Worker Village chase.

Design

196Because The Lost World: Jurassic Park would be featuring both genders of dinosaurs, a new, more colorful, scheme had to be created for the male counterparts of the female Raptors seen in the previous films. Taking inspiration from nature, it was decided that the male color scheme would be noticeably more colorful than the previous, monotone grey-brown of the females. Several different color pallets were applied to line art drawn up by Mark McCreery, including a yellow and black pattern and a green and red pattern that matched the novels. The final color scheme chosen upon by Shane Mahan was an orange and black pattern reminiscent of a tiger.  In order to upgrade from the previous film, Stan Winston Studios used a thinner and slacker pull on the foam latex skin, in order to give the skin more realism.

Animatronics

raptorkilnA total of three full-scale animatronics (one female, two male) were constructed with complete mechanical upgrades to the design. Rather than radio cables that were utilized in the first film, telemetry controlled hydraulics were instead used, giving the Raptors much more fluid and life like movements. Cables were left to only a few of the facial movements, such as tongue and eye movements. The upgrade in the mechanics also meant that instead of the eighteen total puppeteers required to man the cable operated animatronics in Jurassic Park, the new Raptor Bodanimatronics needed as few as two operators. The animatronics were also used by the crew for the actors to visualize where Industrial Light and Magic would later replace the immobile animatronic with a walking CGI counterpart in post production. The animatronics, fully completed, measured six feet tall and thirteen feet long.

Another use of the animatronics was through a partial rig. A partial body build that comprised the torso from the waist up and head/neck sections, the armature was filmed as it broke its way through a passenger seat window in order to get to Dr. Ian Malcolm.

Walking Rig raptorroof

Because of it’s effectiveness in Jurassic Park, another mechanical walking rig was built for use by John Rosengrant for the shot of the Raptor stalking Dr. Sarah Harding on the Kiln House roof.

 

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Rick Galinson

Rick Galinson is an Animatronic EffectsRick Galinson Supervisor and Teacher at Stan Winston School of Character Arts. Galinson was raised in La Jolla, California and eventually graduated from the Universtiy of Southern California with a B.S. in BioMedical Engineering. Shortly after graduating in 1990, he had his first FX job with Kevin Yagher and worked on the films Child’s Play 3 and Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey. After working with Yagher, Galinson moved onto Stan Winston Studio where he worked on the film Jurassic Park. His first major animatronic was the Dilophosaurus, lovingly referred to as ‘the Spitter,’ in the film.

Selected Filmography

  • Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey (1991)
  • Child’s Play 3 (1991)
  • Batman Returns (1992)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Men In Black (1997)
  • Snakes on a Plane (2006)
  • Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem (2007)

Works Cited- Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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Andy Shoneberg

Andy Shoneberg is a two-timeAndy Shoneberg Emmy Award winning special-effects makeup artist, painter, FX sculpter and teacher at Stan Winston School of Character Arts. Shoneberg was born July 17, 1956 in Casper, Wyoming and grew up and in Billings, Montana. At the age of fourteen, Shoneberg began carving foam body parts in his parents’ basement. He studied art in high school and eventually attended Montana State University Billings where was part of the art program. Shoneberg eventually received an invitation to Los Angeles from legendary makeup artist, Dick Smith to attend his course. His first job was creating the feet for the dwarfs in the 1987 film, Snow White. He has since worked at numerous studios including Stan Winston Studio, Rick Baker’s Cinovation, and KNB.

Shoneberg has won two Emmys for his effects work on The Walking Dead. He currently also composes music for Shannon Shea’s webcast, Phantom Harbor

Selected Filmography

  • Snow white (1987)
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dream Child (1989)
  • Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990)
  • Edward Scissorhands (1990)
  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
  • Batman Returns (1992)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Mortal Kombat (1995)
  • Jumanji (1995)
  • Alien: Resurrection (1997)
  • The X-Files (1998)
  • Jurassic Park III (2001)
  • AVP: Aliens vs. Predator (2004)
  • Predators (2010)
  • The Walking Dead (2011)

Works Cited- Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

 

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Palo Alto, California InGen Headquarters (CB-Topps)

InGen’s Headquarters were based in Palo Alto, California. InGen HeadquartersThe exterior of the main building was at least two stories high, with a large class facade in the center. It was from this building that InGen was administrated. Here, John Hammond‘s office was located, wherein he had his desk and a map of the Islands. He also may have stored his cane in the office as well. Employees were issued ID cards, which they wore on their suits.

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Centacom Base, Panama (CB-Topps)

Centacom Base was a military base located in Panama. The base was equipped with naval Hospitalfrigates that were sent out to search any suspicious vehicles arriving from Costa Rica. These ships utilized Radar Equipement. The base was also equipped with Hospital facilities, where Ian Malcolm was recovering from his injuries. The hospital equipment consisted of a bed and a television. The base was headed by a Two-Star general who was in charge.

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Shannon Shea

Shannon Shea was a Character CreationShannon Shea Supervisor at Stan Winston Studios and is currently a teacher at Stan Winston School of Character Arts. He has worked on numerous films in the past and was a puppeteer for the sick Triceratops animatronic in the first Jurassic Park film.

Biography

Shannon Shea grew up in New Orleans and, as a child, was heavily influenced by the character creation work of Willis O’Brien and Ray Harryhausen. Shea attended CalArts and worked with the experimental character animation program. However, this did not last and he left school in order to pursue a career in special makeup effects. He was hired on at Stan Winston Studios in the mid-1980s and first contributed to the studio during the production of Aliens. He has since contributed to many other film franchises including Jurassic Park. In 2008, Shea, along with his wife Tracy, launched his own internet show, Phantom Harbor. He designed and created all of the miniatures, puppets, and animation.

Selected Filmography

  • Aliens (1986)
  • Predator (1987)
  • Pumpkinhead (1988)
  • A Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dream Child (1989)
  • Dances with Wolves (1990)
  • Terminator 2: Judgement Day (1991)
  • Batman Returns (1992)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Cats and Dogs (2001)
  • Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003)
  • Casino Royale (2006)
  • Predators (2010)
  • Ted (2012)

Works Cited- Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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Costa Rican Police (CB-Topps)

The police showed up to the site of Paco‘s farm after the deaths of Paco and Juana. They covered the body with sheets They were equipped with rifles and had driven to the scene of the crime in a jeep. There were at least three or four policemen who investigated the bodies. Later while patrolling the town, several of the police were attacked by Dilophosaurs.

The Police Captain was in charge of the town’s police force, and seemed skeptical that theScreen Shot 2013-11-12 at 8.25.01 AM attacks had been caused by a supernatural being. He attempted to console a despondent Aguilar,then admonished him not to interfere in the police investigation. His real name is revealed to be Jorge, and that he has known Aguilar all his life. They recently had a falling out over Catana, the mutal object of their affections. However, when the Dilophosaurs attacked, he quickly assisted Aguilar in helping to exterminate them. Assigning several police to a house to protect the citizens, he assisted Aguilar in driving the dinosaurs to the edge of a cliff where they were able to kill them. The Police Captain owned a lighter, and is seen smoking.

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Joey Orosco

Joey Orosco is a key artist for Joey OroscoLegacy Effects, formerly Stan Winston Studios. He is well known for his work in the Jurassic Park franchise. His work includes painting the sick Triceratops animatronic, sculpting the main body of the Tyrannosaur animatronic from the first film, and also sculpting the Spinosaurus from Jurassic Park III.

Selected Filmography

  • Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1991)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles (1994)
  • Congo (1995)
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • The Sixth Sense (1999)
  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)
  • Jurassic Park III (2001)
  • Alien vs. Predator: Requiem (2007)
  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)
  • Avatar (2009)
  • Predators (2010)
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Steven Spielberg

Steven Allan Spielberg is an American filmmaker born in December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Spielberg is an film director, screenwriter, producer, and business magnate. He is one of the most commercially successful directors in history, having directed three different films that topped the all-time theatrical gross charts; one in the 1970s (Jaws), 1980s (E.T. The Extra Terrestrial) and 1990s (Jurassic Park). He is also critically acclaimed as he has directed several Academy Award nominees for best picture, winning once in 1993 for Schindler’s List–a film for which he also won his first of two Oscars for best director (the other being Saving Private Ryan). He is known for being a part of the directorial generation that revived Hollywood and is also considered the father of the summer blockbuster thanks to Jaws. He was a recipient of the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, a special Academy Award, in 1987. He has had a long association with Universal Studios and Dreamworks.

Biography
Spielberg was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, to a Jewish family. His mother, Leah Adler (née Posner, 1920– ), was a restaurateur and concert pianist, and his father, Arnold Spielberg (1917– ), was an electrical engineer involved in the development of computers. He spent his childhood in Haddon Township, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona.

In 1958, he became a Boy Scout, and fulfilled a requirement for the photography merit badge by making a nine-minute 8 mm film entitled The Last Gunfight. Spielberg recalled years later to a magazine interviewer, “My dad’s still-camera was broken, so I asked the scoutmaster if I could tell a story with my father’s movie camera. He said yes, and I got an idea to do a Western. I made it and got my merit badge. That was how it all started.” In 1963, at age sixteen, Spielberg wrote and directed his first independent film, a 140-minute science fiction adventure called Firelight (which would later inspire Close Encounters of a Third Kind). The film, which had a budget of US$500, was shown in his local cinema and generated a profit of $1. He also made several WWII films inspired by his father’s war stories.

After his parents divorced, he moved to Saratoga, California with his father. His three sisters and mother remained in Arizona. Spielberg graduated from Saratoga High School in 1965. It was during this time Spielberg attained the rank of Eagle Scout. Spielberg attended Hebrew school from 1953 to 1957, in classes taught by Rabbi Albert L. Lewis, who would later be memorialized as the main character in Mitch Albom’s Have a Little Faith.

After moving to California, he applied to attend the film school at University of Southern California School of Theater, Film and Television two separate times, but was unsuccessful. He subsequently became a student at California State University, Long Beach. While attending Long Beach State in the 1960s, Spielberg became a brother of Theta Chi Fraternity. His actual career began when he returned to Universal Studios as an unpaid, seven-day-a-week intern and guest of the editing department (uncredited). After Spielberg became famous, USC awarded him an honorary degree in 1994, and in 1996 he became a trustee of the university. In 2002, thirty-five years after starting college, Spielberg finished his degree via independent projects at CSULB, and was awarded a B.A. in Film Production and Electronic Arts with an option in Film/Video Production.

As an intern and guest of Universal Studios, Spielberg made his first short film for theatrical release, the 26-minute Amblin’ (1968), the title of which inspired the name of his production company, Amblin Entertainment. After Sidney Sheinberg, then the vice-president of production for Universal’s TV arm, saw the film, Spielberg became the youngest director ever to be signed for a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio. He dropped out of Long Beach State in 1969 to take up the television director contract at Universal Studios and began his career as a professional director.

His first professional TV job came when he was hired to direct one of the segments for the 1969 pilot episode of Night Gallery. The segment, “Eyes,” starred Joan Crawford, they were reportedly close friends until her death.  After this, and an episode of Marcus Welby, M.D., Spielberg got his first feature-length assignment: an episode of The Name of the Game called “L.A. 2017″. He did another segment on Night Gallery and did some work for shows such as Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law and The Psychiatrist before landing the first series episode of Columbo.

Based on the strength of his work, Universal signed Spielberg to do four TV films. The first was a Richard Matheson adaptation called Duel. The film is about a psychotic Peterbilt 281 tanker truck driver who chases a terrified driver (Dennis Weaver) of a small Plymouth Valiant and tries to run him off the road. Special praise of this film by the influential British critic Dilys Powell was highly significant to Spielberg’s career. Another TV film (Something Evil) was made and released to capitalize on the popularity of The Exorcist, then a major best-selling book which had not yet been released as a film. He fulfilled his contract by directing the TV film length pilot of a show called Savage, starring Martin Landau. Spielberg’s debut feature film was The Sugarland Express, about a married couple who are chased by police as the couple tries to regain custody of their baby. Spielberg’s cinematography for the police chase was praised by reviewers, and The Hollywood Reporter stated that “a major new director is on the horizon.”  However, the film fared poorly at the box office and received a limited release.

 

Spielberg circa Jaws (1975).

Studio producers Richard D. Zanuck and David Brown offered Spielberg the director’s chair for Jaws, a thriller-horror film based on the Peter Benchley novel about a killer shark. Spielberg has often referred to the grueling shoot as his professional crucible. Despite the film’s ultimate, enormous success, it was nearly shut down due to delays and budget over-runs. However Spielberg finished the film and it became a box office-smashing hit, winning three Academy Awards (for editing, original score and sound) and grossing more than $470 million worldwide at the box office. It also set the domestic record for box office gross, leading to what the press described as “Jawsmania.” Which set the stage for the modern summer blockbuster and made him a household name. It was nominated for Best Picture and featured Spielberg’s first of three collaborations with actor Richard Dreyfuss.

Spielberg and actor Richard Dreyfuss re-convened to work on Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977). Close Encounters was a critical and box office hit, giving Spielberg his first Best Director nomination from the Academy as well as earning six other Academy Awards nominations. This second blockbuster helped to secure Spielberg’s rise.

Next, Spielberg teamed with Star Wars creator and friend George Lucas on an action adventure film, Raiders of the Lost Ark, the first of the Indiana Jones films. The archaeologist and adventurer hero Indiana Jones was played by Harrison Ford. It became the biggest film at the box office in 1981, and the recipient of numerous Oscar nominations including Best Director (Spielberg’s second nomination) and Best Picture (the second Spielberg film to be nominated for Best Picture). Raiders is still considered a landmark example of the action-adventure genre.

A year later, Spielberg returned to the science fiction genre with E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial went on to become the top-grossing film of all time. E.T. was also nominated for nine Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Director.

His next directorial feature was the Raiders prequel Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. This film and the Spielberg-produced Gremlins led to the creation of the PG-13 rating due to the high level of violence in films targeted at younger audiences. In spite of this, Temple of Doom is rated PG by the MPAA. Nonetheless, the film was still a huge blockbuster hit in 1984. It was on this project that Spielberg also met his future wife, actress Kate Capshaw.

 

Spielberg during the production of The Color Purple (1985).

In 1985, Spielberg released The Color Purple, an adaptation of Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name, about a generation of empowered African-American women during depression-era America. Starring Whoopi Goldberg and future talk-show superstar Oprah Winfrey, the film was a box office smash and critics hailed Spielberg’s successful foray into the dramatic genre.

 

After two forays into more serious dramatic films, Spielberg then directed the third Indiana Jones film, 1989′s Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. The film earned generally positive reviews and was another box office success, becoming the highest grossing film worldwide that year.

In 1993, Spielberg returned to the adventure genre with the film version of Michael Crichton’s novel Jurassic Park, about a theme park with genetically engineered dinosaurs. With revolutionary special effects provided by friend George Lucas’s Industrial Light & Magic, the film would eventually become the highest-grossing film of all-time with $914.7 million. This would be the third time and final time that one of Spielberg’s films became the highest-grossing film ever.

Spielberg’s next film, Schindler’s List, was based on the true story of Oskar Schindler, a man who risked his life to save 1,100 Jews from the Holocaust. Schindler’s List earned Spielberg his first Academy Award for Best Director and Best Picture. A huge success at the box office, Spielberg used the profits to set up the Shoah Foundation, a non-profit organization that archives filmed testimony of Holocaust survivors. It is listed as one of the best films in history.

In 1994, Spielberg took a hiatus from directing to spend more time with his family and build his new studio, DreamWorks, with partners Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen. In 1997, he helmed the sequel to 1993′s Jurassic Park with The Lost World: Jurassic Park, which generated over $618 million worldwide despite mixed reviews, and was the second biggest hit of 1997 behind James Cameron’s Titanic which topped the original Jurassic Park to become the new record holder for box office receipts.

Spielberg released his next film Amistad under DreamWorks Pictures, which issued all of his films from Amistad until Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull in May 2008.

 

On the Normandy set of Saving Private Ryan (1998).

His next theatrical release in that same year was the World War II film Saving Private Ryan. Spielberg won his second Academy Award for his direction. The film’s graphic, realistic depiction of combat violence influenced later war films such as Black Hawk Down and Enemy at the Gates. The film was also the first major hit for DreamWorks, which co-produced the film with Paramount Pictures. Later, Spielberg and Tom Hanks produced a TV mini-series based on Stephen Ambrose’s book Band of Brothers. The series won a number of awards at the Golden Globesand the Emmys.

In 2005, Empire magazine ranked Spielberg number one on a list of the greatest film directors of all time. Also in 2005, Spielberg directed a modern adaptation of War of the Worlds. The film was another huge box office smash, grossing over $591 million worldwide.

Spielberg’s film Munich, about the events following the 1972 Munich Massacre of Israeli athletes at the Olympic Games, Munich received five Academy Awards nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director for Spielberg. It was Spielberg’s sixth Best Director nomination and fifth Best Picture nomination.

In 2007, Spielberg was diagnosed with dyslexia, which he disclosed five years later in an interview.

Spielberg directed Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, which was released on May 22, 2008. This was his first film not to be released by DreamWorks since 1997. The film received generally positive reviews from critics and grossed $317 million domestically, and over $786 million worldwide.

 

Directing on location of War Horse in Britain (2011).

In early 2009, Spielberg shot the first film in a planned trilogy of motion capture films based on The Adventures of Tintin, written by Belgian artist Hergé, with Peter Jackson. The Adventures of Tintin, was not released until October 2011, due to the complexity of the computer animation involved. It received generally positive reviews from critics and grossed over $373 million worldwide. Spielberg followed that with War Horse, shot in England in the summer of 2010. It was released just four days after The Adventures of Tintin, on December 25, 2011.  The film was released and distributed by Disney, with whom DreamWorks has made a 30-picture deal. War Horse received generally positive reviews from critics, and was nominated for six Academy Awards including Best Picture.

Spielberg next directed the historical drama film Lincoln, Daniel Day-Lewis as United States President Abraham Lincoln and Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln. It was released in November 2012 by Disney’s Touchstone Pictures label in the United States. Upon release, Lincoln received widespread critical acclaim and was nominated for twelve Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Director for Spielberg.


Selected Directorial Filmography

  • Amblin’ (1968)
  • Jaws (1975) **‡
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)‡
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)**‡
  • E.T. The Extra Terrestrial (1982)**‡
  • Poltergeist (1982)
  • Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)
  • Jurassic Park (1993)
  • Schindler’s List (1993)*†
  • The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
  • Saving Private Ryan (1998) **†
  • War of the Worlds (2005)
  • Munich (2005)**‡
  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)
  • Lincoln (2012) **‡

 

† Best Director Winner
‡ Nominated for Best Director
*Best Picture Winner
**Best Picture Nominee

Jurassic Park
Steven Spielberg’s most financially successful film started out as a novel. The novel and–to a point–the film’s writer, Michael Crichton, penned the story in the late 1980s as a science-fiction thriller/horror about man’s folly in controlling nature. Being a good friend of Crichton’s dating back to a studio tour Spielberg had given Crichton in the early 1970s, Spielberg and Crichton had collaborated many times in the successive years and Steven usually would receive an insider’s look at what was on the writer’s plate. It was during a collaboration on the future television show, ER, that Michael first told Steven about the manuscript that would become the Jurassic Park novel.

Steven Spielberg on location, shooting Jurassic Park (1993).

Steven read the novel and eventually pleaded with his friend to direct the adaptation. Even before the book was published, studios lined up to have the rights to the novel–with Spielberg being backed by Universal. Universal eventually won the bidding rights and paid Crichton an additional sum to port Jurassic Park from novel to film script form. Steven was required by Universal to complete his work on Jurassic Park prior to his work on his best picture and best director film Schindler’s List, which he initially wanted to do first. Spielberg later reflected that this “was for the best” as he later found out he wouldn’t have been in the state of mind to complete production on the blockbuster after Schindler’s List.

During pre-production Spielberg planned to have all the dinosaurs made full size, which included the massive 80 foot Brachiosaurus. He quickly realized the impracticality of such a feat and assembled the best team of FX artists he could. Including the ILM VFX house, Stan Winston’s practical machines house and Phil Tippett’s go-motion studio. Tippett was initially put in charge of animating the larger creatures and the action set-pieces that couldn’t be done by the practical animatronics of Stan Winston Studios.

Steven spent the preparation for the production location scouting in the Hawaiian Island Chain and holding meetings on film sequences with Stan Winston, Michael Lantieri and Dennis Muren; among others. One particular meeting discussed a sequence in the final film that detailed the famous morse code claw tap by the Velociraptors in the film in the kitchen set piece.

While in pre-production, Dennis Muren showcased a simulation of a Tyrannosaurus rex in harsh sunlight and chasing a herd of computer generated Gallimimus. It was with this test footage that Spielberg opted to forgo the usage of Phil Tippett’s landmark go-motion for ILM’s CGI technology. Tippett would remain on production as Dinosaur Supervisor–he would oversee ILM’s animation efforts to ensure life-like imitations of animal movements and locomotion. His reply to the technology that would replace him was used as dialogue by Spielberg in the film, “don’t you mean extinct?”.

Spielberg made several key thematic and plot changes over the course of filming, one during pre-production. Steven Spielberg decided to honor a prior commitment and signed Joseph Mazzello to play Tim Murphy, in a divergence from the novel, Spielberg had to switch the ages of the two children, making Tim the younger sibling in the movie. Further changes included the famed “cup of water/thunder footfalls” scene in the main road set piece. Spielberg came up with the gag while listening to band Earth, Wind and Fire in his car. As a result, Michael Lantieri was tasked with finding out a way to cause the vibrating water seamlessly. He used a thrumming guitar string lined underneath the cup to accomplish the effect. Another change was to make the frilled Dilophosaurus, a medium-sized carnivore into a juvenile Spielberg downgraded its size to create a distinguishing factor between it and the Velociraptors and to play up its surprise menace in the film. Quite possibly the biggest change in the movie and the biggest divergence in the book occurred during the shoot. Spielberg decided that the Tyrannosaurus needed to make one last grand appearance in the film and altered the ending to reflect that. The T. rex wound up killing the antagonist Raptors thus allowing the heroes to escape rather than the original ending which featured John Hammond as the hero. He completed shooting two weeks ahead of schedule.

Steven’s impact on post-production was largely negated by the fact that he had to leave a few weeks in to prepare for Schindler’s List. His friend George Lucas handled duties for him after Spielberg approved a rough cut made by Michael Kahn. It should be noted that most of the post-production work was still reviewed him, he was just not actively present during the work. He also enlisted the help of his friend John Williams to score the movie.

 

The Lost World: Jurassic Park

In the director’s chair on The Lost World: Jurassic Park.

Steven chose to take a hiatus from filming after completing his holocaust epic Schindler’s List. Approximately two years later he decided to make a Jurassic Park sequel his first project off break. The first thing he did however was convince Crichton to pen a sequel novel to his smash-hit. This provided Spielberg with the power to justify a sequel movie and start his work. He met with key members of the Lost World production in a diner he owned in May of ’95.

 

Many of the meetings discussed similar things to the pre-production meetings of JP. Many of the sequences that they wanted to include were ironed out here, including a few from the recently released Jurassic Park novel sequel. He also chose a different principal filming location for the sequel, choosing to use more classic upper northwest American forest instead of pacific tropical. He also wanted to make the movie a darker film, using tone and time to set the mood.

David Koepp was enlisted to write the screenplay for the film. Spielberg wanted to do the hunter-gatherer scenario involving the “Great White Hunter”. He also had a strong feeling of obligation to return to the films and create this sequel because he enjoyed making the first movie and he felt a need to fulfill the fan’s wishes for a second. However, as the production progressed his feelings changed in that he felt a lack of meaning behind the movie and that it was a hollow chase picture.

He cast Jeff Goldblum, Sir Richard Attenborough, Joseph Mazzello and Ariana Richards in returning roles, with the latter three serving solely in a cameo capacity. He also cast the role of Nick Van Owen purely on a chance encounter with Vince Vaughn’s castmate, Jon Favreau, who contacted Spielberg in order to use the theme from Jaws in the movie Swingers–the film Favreau was working on with Vaughn. Spielberg was impressed by Vaughn’s performance and cast him shortly after.

Like the previous installment, Spielberg had intended a different ending from that seen in the film. The original ending in the script called for  an extended Worker’s Village climax set piece that culminated in the heroes and Roland Tembo, the Great White Hunter, escaping the island with an escort from Pteranodons. Spielberg–again–changed the climax, cutting down the length and scope of the Worker’s Village portion of the plot and extending the cut time into a King Kong-esque Tyrannosaurus rex rampage through suburban San Diego. Spielberg chose the ending in order to honor the original The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle–the story was the inspiration behind the title–and King Kong, with a subtle nod to Godzilla. The ending resulted in the dinosaurs being known to the public and Spielberg concluding his involvement in the series from a directorial standpoint.

Unlike with Jurassic Park, Steven had oversaw the post-production process personally. In a noted difference from Hollywood convention, John Williams composed an almost entirely new score for the movie from its predecessor for Steven.

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Tyrannosaurus rex Animatronics (JP)

250For the first Jurassic Park film, two life sized Tyrannosaurus rex animatronics were constructed by Stan Winston Studios to be used on sound stages for the Main Road Attack sequence. Constructed were one forty foot long, full sized animatronic, and another that was more precision based and built only from the torso up. Both were controlled by telemetry devices.

Design 

tumblr_mo7r796aBH1rsiohpo2_1280For the film, Stan Winston Studios was chosen for the construction of the life sized animatronics, the decision based on the effects firms’ previous work on the 1986 James Cameron action/sci-fi film Aliens, where the company constructed a life sized, 14 ft tall Alien Queen puppet. Working in collaboration with Mark Hallett, Robert Bakker, and Gregory S. Paul, Mark McCreery was tasked by Stan Winston to draw up designs for the Tyrannosaurus. In the concept art, Stan Winston wanted dynamic poses and other depictions that would express the endothermy of the film’s non-human stars. This entire concept design stage took an entire year to complete. Meanwhile, in preparation for the construction of the Minirexsetgigantic full sized animatronic, Stan Winston Studios purchased a next door building and had a section of the roof raised thirteen feet in order to accommodate the prehistoric proportions of the full sized, twenty foot tall maquette. From here, Stan Winston Studios began the daunting task of constructing a full sized maquette from modelling clay that would be used in the molding of the foam latex skin that would go over the interior hydraulics.

Imagen096To construct such a maquette, mechanical department coordinator Richard Landon first built a sixteenth scale maquette used primarily for color scheme concept and a fifth scale maquette that was used to construct the shape of the full scale maquette. The interior armature, of which Richard Landon was also in charge of constructing, was crafted from steel and wood in the general shape of the maquette. From here, chicken wire was laid over the frame and then fiberglass sheets and hardware clothe over the chicken wire in order to give the armature shape. The maquette was constructed from 3 tons of Roma clay, with the main body sculpted by Joey Orosco, Mark Jurinko, Bill Basco, Robert throwingclayHenderstein, and Greg Fiegel. The legs were sculpted by Len Burge and Christopher Swift, while Michael Trcic was in charge of the head and neck (Trcic also constructed the skull for the animatronic later in the process), and the arms were sculpted separately from the body. Sculpting of the clay took sixteen weeks in of itself. Because of the weight of the clay maquette, the exterior aluminum frame that was used to support the maquette had to be switched out for steel.

Full Sized Animatronic

bigrig1The full sized animatronic was initially designed by Disney Imagineer Bob Gurr, who knew instantly the the project would require hydraulics. Initially, Stan Winston wished to construct the full sized Tyrannosaurus as a life sized puppet, but early tests of the idea quickly nullified the notion. Stan also wished to use an electric motor based system, however the electric motors of the early 1990′s would not give the animatronic the speed that Stan Winston wanted. In the end, Stan Winston too decided upon the use of hydraulics to fully bring the character to life.  The designs for the animatronic were all created in miniature to test the feasibility in the larger final animatronic. Key participant in the construction  Richard Landon. Landon conducted the construction of the internal mechanics and main armature of the animatronic. He also oversaw the designs of the miniature concept designs, and himself designed the walking rig for the animatronic; the animatronic’s legs moved separately from the body on a track.

motionbase1The animatronic was built on a main base of a device based on designs for flight simulators custom built by McFadden Systems for SWS. The motion based platform that would provide the gross movements for the animatronic that would be built upon it. The platform could be controlled by a four-person operated telemetry device, dubbed “Wally”, which was a miniature of the motion based platform. Before either the platform or the animatronic would be built, however, the floors of both the SWS shop and of Stage 16 where the animatronic would be used had to be specially reinforced to handle the expected weight of the animatronic. The animatronic was constructed of steel, though aluminum and other materials were considered. The decision was made when Stan Winston asked welder SkeletonArmando Gonzales what material would be the easiest to repair should the animatronic break down during production. Gonzales was also responsible for final welds on the rig, buffing and dulling any sharp points or corners on the armature that could have any chance of puncturing the foam latex skin that would later go over the graphite-fiber frame. The portions of the frame that provided large movement, such as the neck and tail, were constructed through spiral rings. Rather than separate circular rings that were commonly constructed by animatronic makers of the day, the spiral rings did not let the frame slide or bunch up in skinning2places and therefore was more stable. However, because Newtonian Laws still enacted upon the character, SWS fitted the animatronic with an accelerometer, to stabilize the animatronic in gross movement, which could reach 90 inches per second. The skin overlaying the frame was two inch thick foam rubber, and was cast in sections in order to be fitted onto the animatronic. Because of this, more foam rubber had to be cast in order to fill in the gaps. In the end, the entire full sized animatronic weighed 9 tons, was 40 ft long, and could raise itself 24 ft into the air. The fifty-seven functions and movements on the character were all hydraulic based, save for the eyes which were radio controlled.

JP1FullRexDespite assurances to Stan Winston from Universal Studios that the Tyrannosaurus rig would not be directly rained upon, the animatronic ended up becoming drenched daily while shooting the Main Road scene. Due to the absorbent nature of foam rubber, the skin of the quickly would become saturated during filming, forcing film crews to have to halt shooting in order to dry the animatronic with towels. Overnight crews would have to set fans onto the animatronic in order to dry it fully by morning for shooting. The main problem of the saturation was that the animatronic’s hydraulic build meant that the rig was highly susceptible to the weight added by the water. If the animatronic became too wet, the  entire rig would shake violently. Between the constant weight changes dependent on how wet or dry the animatronic was, the animatronic had to be weighed 346constantly. One unfortunate night, the overnight crew had to call an emergency meeting when they discovered the bottom jaw had broken on the animatronic. Through half the next day, Stan Winston and his crew took time to repair the animatronic, meaning no filming took place that day. Despite all the water problems, the animatronic performed fantastically well, allowing director Steven Spielberg to shave four days off of the filming schedule.

Insert Animatronic

rexcarBuilt only from the waist up, a second animatronic was created for close up shots and intense interaction with the Tyrannosaurus. Because of it’s need for close-ups, the skin on this animatronic was more detailed, as was the paint. It had very limited animatronic functions, but was also heavily built. The animatronic also utilized an incredibly precise, computer based “action memory” that could be used to preprogram movements into the animatronic that could be repeated with perfection multiple times. This action memory allowed the Tyrannosaurus to push herself through the bathroom hut wall without harming Donald Gennaro (Martin Ferraro) inside.

Sound Design

The Tyrannosaurus was among the most complex sound concepts for the Jurassic Park franchise. For the first movie, because Spielberg wished for the film to be something more than ‘another monster movie’ and to truly represent the dinosaurs as living animals rather than prehistoric beasts, Gary Rydstrom was tasked with finding as many original sound sources as possible in order to give the Tyrannosaurus more than just a single repetitive roar as was the norm for previous dinosaur films.

For the sound crew, Rydstrom recorded samples from baby elephants, alligators, tigers, whales, and even sourced from Rydstrom’s pet Jack Russell terrier, Buster. Additionally, sound samples from mating tortoises were thrown into the sound mix. The famous roar of the Tyrannosaurus was created through mixing the sounds with a base sound of a trumpeting baby elephant. Growls and various rumblings were made through mixing of the alligator and tiger. The snorting was the sound of a whale’s blow hole exhaling. While the growling sound made when the Tyrannosaurus shook a Gallimimus was the sound of Buster playing tug-of-war with a rope.

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Spinosaurus Animatronic

content_jurassic_park_iii-009An animatronic Spinosaurus was built for the third installment of the Jurassic Park franchise. The animatronic was the largest built by Stan Winston Studios and also the most dynamic. The Spinosaurus animatronic first appeared in a scene in which the Spinosaurus attacks the main protagonist in a downed airplane. It was used again for a battle scene in which it faced down against a Tyrannosaurus, however, most of the scenes involving the animatronics never made it into the actual film. Lastly, the animatronic was used in a scene in which it attacks the protagonists on a barge in the middle of a river.

Design

The Spinosaurus was originally designed bySpino Stan Winston Studio artist, Mark “Crash” McCreery, while concept colorations were drawn up by Jurassic Park 3 storyboard artist Ricardo Delgado. Key artist Joey Orosco, along with John Rosengrant, Rob Ramsdell, Paul Mejias, and Trevor Hensley, sculpted a one-fifth-scale maquette based on McCreery’s original design. According to Orosco, since a partial Spinosaurus skull was discovered around the time of preproduction for the third film, the filmmakers decided to add it into the franchise. Paleontologist consultant Jack Horner also suggested Spinosaurus as the new dinosaur to introduce it to the public as an alternative to the franchise’s previous Tyrannosaurs. Horner also helped the design team in the coloration choices.

Full-Sized Animatronic Spinosaurus

Unlike the Tyrannosaurus, in which warm content_jurassic_park_iii_spinosaurus_blog_7clay was sculpted into a full-scale model, the one-fifth-scale Spinosaurus maquette was digitally scanned and computer-milled into foam pieces. The foam was then assembled into the full-scale Spinosaurus. To get the Spinosaurus prepared for molding, the foam was coated with a type of paint to help seal the foam from the high-temperature epoxy. All joints were filled in with clay. After the epoxy was applied, it was followed up by a fiberglass-type cloth. A structure in the sail allowed the sail to flex with the animatronic’s spine. The animatronic was then broken down to fit in the ovens and a special-made spandex was applied and would be the under-surface for the one to three inch skin.

content_jurassic_park_iii_spinosaurus_blog_18When completed, the Spinosaurus measured around 13.7 meters (45ft) in length and weighed around 12.5 tons. The “skull” was built out of graphite which made it both light and strong. and held approximately seventy-six teeth within the jawline, although several more sets were molded in the unavoidable event that teeth would be loss or damaged during film shoots. Based on the design of the Tyrannosaurus animatronics used in The Lost World: Jurassic Park, the Spinosaurus was built from the “knees up” and mounted to a motorized trackway. The Spinosaurus was the fastest animatronic built by the studio and used ‘hot-rod’ hydraulics that were controlled using an eighteen inch telemetry device. The Spinosaurus ran on nearly 1,000 horsepower compared to the previous Tyrannosaurus, that only ran on 200 horsepower.

trexspinoThe Spinosaurus then had to be loaded on to a tractor trailer, using cranes, and moved to the set. The animatronic was so big that the studio had to remove the doors in order to get it outside. The city of Los Angeles wanted the animatronic to be moved at night on a specific route, as it couldn’t go under bridges, so traffic in the city wouldn’t be stalled. Final paint details were added on the set. On set usage was very intense. Due to the power of the hydraulically ran animatronic, a powerful hit from the snout could send a man twenty feet in the air, or even kill them. As such, extra precautions were taken when using the animatronic, and, like with the Tyrannosaurus animatronics used in the previous films, only those who were absolutely necessary for the filming of a scene were allowed on the set.

SpinoEndBecause the Spinosaurus versus T. rex fight was the final scene filmed with the Spinosaurus animatronic, the Stan Winston Studios crew decided to go all out in the battle. The crew had the puppets act out as if they were fighting a real battle. However, during the fight, the Spinosaurus‘ superior powerful hydraulics literally allowed the Spinosaurus to behead the Tyrannosaurus animatronic with a single swipe from the Spinosaurus‘ clawed arm. During the filming of the final climactic River fight where the Spinosaurus ambushes the protagonists, Stan Winston Studios deliberately left loose calibrations on the Spinosaurus animatronic in the event that water seepage would effect the weight based hydraulics. The foam latex skin was also coated in several water tight sealants, and the head of the animatronic was made out of hard urethane rubber. The interior robotics of the animatronic were all sealed against water.

Works Cited:

What are Spinosaurus Made of? An awesome look at the making of the 12-ton, thousand-horsepower dinosaur. Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

The Winston Effect: The Art and History of Stan Winston Studios (Duncan 2006)

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Town (CB-Topps)

In the unnamed Costa Rican town, the local police force were equipped with rifles which appeared to be AK-47′s. TPolice weaponshey were also equipped with jeeps that could seat approximately four people. The other faction in town, Aguilar’s gang-was equipped with motorcycles, and a wide variety of pistols, rifles and shotguns.

In the town were several important buildings of note, including the police building, where the police force resided. In addition, there was also an orphanage where the towns orphans were housed. Aguilar’s gang also maintained a house there as their primary base of operations. The streets of the town were empty, with stray cats wandering the streets.

Motorcycle and Shotgun

Motorcycle and Shotgun

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San Jose Population (CB-Topps)

Waiter and TouristsAs Dennis Nedry was waiting at an Outdoor Cafe in San Jose, at least two waiters can be seen. They are serving and assisting the tourists that come to eat at the cafe, of which there appear to be at least three or four besides Nedry. In addition, there are passerby that are walking by the cafe, but are depicted as too far away to see clearly.

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Juvenile Triceratops Animatronic

baby triceratops smallAn animatronic of a juvenile Triceratops was created by Stan Winston Studios for the first Jurassic Park film, along with a sick adult Triceratops. The scene in which it interacted with Lex, however, never made it into the film. The animatronic made its debut in The Lost World: Jurassic Park as a juvenile Triceratops captured by InGen on Isla Sorna to bring to Jurassic Park: San Diego.

jurassic-triceratopsDesign

The juvenile Triceratops was originally designed by artist Mark “Crash” McCreery of Stan Winston Studios. Artist Shannon Shea painted the animatronic.FullSizeBabyTriceratopsHeadbeingPainted01

 

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Crush Injury Component (C/N)

Crush injury component is the concept that an injury involving severe compression or crushing of the body leaves evidence of that type of injury.

Dr. Roberta Carter investigated the body of a young man who InGen Public Relations officer Ed Regis claimed had been crushed in a construction accident. She found that the body did not match the report of injury because there was no crush injury component to the wounds, instead that they were consistent with an animal mauling.

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Triceratops Animatronic (JP)

Scan_Pic0003Stan Winston Studios created a full sized animatronic Triceratops for the first Jurassic Park film. The animatronic was used in the scene in which a Triceratops is ill and paleobotanist, Dr. Ellie Sattler, helps Jurassic Park veterinarian Dr. Gerry Harding determine what is causing the illness. The animatronic was also the only one filmed on location in Kauai and not on a sound stage in Los Angeles.

Design

The Triceratops was originally designedadult triceratops small by Stan Winston Studio artist, Mark “Crash” McCreery. A small-scale maquette, based on McCreery’s design, was modified to be in a sick position on its side. The maquette was used to determine how the full-sized animatronic would move and where cables and pulleys would be placed.

Full-Sized Animatronic Triceratops

Al Sousa was the lead mechanical designer for the sick Triceratops. For realism, the Triceratops was sculpted lying down. The animatronic had no hydraulics but instead, consisted mainly of cables and pulleys. A post in the chest cavity was activated by a lever and moved up and down to create a realistic breathing motion. A direct linkage mechanism Animatronic Triceratopsin the tail provided side to side and up and down movement. Joey Orosco was the Lead Triceratops Artist and, along with another Stan Winston Studios artist, Mark Jurinko, painted the detailed and elaborate pattern on the animatronic.

The studio was rushed to get the Triceratops to Kauai so the legs were removed to fit the animatronic in a shipping container. After arriving in Kauai a month later, the legs were reattached and Orosco finished the paint job. In Kauai, a pit was dug to house the control mechanisms and a platform, along with the animatronic, was placed over the pit. The Animatronic Triceratops on Locationoperators would descend into the pit where they would control the animatronic. One operator controlled the tail while another one controlled the legs and breathing mechanism. Above ground, operator Shannon Shea used a remote control to operate the eye movements. Shea was also responsible for the cosmetics of the animal. This included puss, saliva, and rheumy eyes. In order to create realistic microvesicles on the tongue, Shea used a syringe to fill a cavity with a mixture resembling puss. Onscreen actor, Laura Dern, would squeeze the microvesicle causing the “puss” to leak out.

No walkie-talkies had arrived on location so Stan Winston directed the operators in the pit via a monitor. He coordinated the mouth and tongue movements to the rise and fall of theAnimatronic triceratops with crew chest to make the animal look ill. He also wanted the leg movements to be slow as if the the animal had been sedated and was disoriented. For added realism, Mr. Winston had the crew get handfuls of dirt and cover the animatronic to mimic the behavior of modern animals such as rhinos and elephants.

Works Cited- JURASSIC PARK TRICERATOPS-Part 1 and 2-Puppeteering an Animatronic Dinosaur. Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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Brachiosaurus Animatronic

BrachHeadA Brachiosaurus animatronic was built by Stan Winston Studios for the first Jurassic Park film. Its only appearance was a scene in which it interacts with Grant, Lex and Tim in a tree. All other scenes involving the animal are CGI.

DesignBrachiosaurus Drawing

The Brachiosaurus was designed by Stan Winston Studios artist Mark “Crash” McCreery and based off of specimens of Brachiosaurus brancai, now called Giraffatitan.

Full-Sized Animatronic Brachiosaurus

Brachiosaurus AnimatronicAndy Shoneberg, a key artist at Stan Winston Studios, worked on the Brachiosaurus puppet. The Brachiosaurus was the largest puppet built that contained no hydraulics. The puppet consisted of only Brachiosaurusthe neck and head and stood around 2.3 meters (7.5ft). Stan Winston wanted the animal to be very docile so Shoneberg, and the rest of the crew working on the animatronic, installed a four-axis jaw that not only moved up and down, but side to side. This gave the animal a very cow-like appearance. In all, six puppeteers controlled the animatronic; either controlling the eyes, jaws, tongue, lips, or the head and neck.

Works Cited- JURASSIC PARK Brachiosaurus Animatronic Puppet Rehearsal. Stan Winston School of Character Arts (2013)

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Paleontological Dig Volunteers (CB-Topps)

Group shot of volunteers

Group shot of volunteers

Alan Grant hired a large group of volunteers to assist him with his paleontological dig in Montana. These volunteers helped to operate the computer and Grant relied on their assistance to save money in the absence of funding. He also relied on their work in order to complete his dig within the four summers his dig’s funding was allotted. The volunteers seemed to be of varied ages, from children to adults.

Volunteer lady

Volunteer lady

There was also indications that several of the volunteers had signed up without doing much research about dinosaurs or even the books of the man heading the dig. Several of the volunteers seemed to have different positions, such as operating the computer, or informing Grant about the readiness of projects. (As seen in a volunteer lady informing Grant about the computer.)

Volunteer Boy

Volunteer Boy

Most notable among the group of volunteers is a boy who doubts Grant’s statement that dinosaurs are descended from birds, and mocks him. Grant responded by describing the Veloociraptors hunting methods to the boy, which scares him. Grant is later chided by Ellie Sattler for frightening him, saying that he could have used a gun if he wanted to scare him.

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