Jurassic World Toy Review

Just going to go over these fairly quickly of my latest purchases from my local ToysRUs about the new JW toys. This is to help you all to know what’s decent and what’s outright horrible and make some responsible financial decisions on your investment in these toys.anky

1.) Basher/Biters – Some are decent sculpts, some are just overall very crappy. It’s a hit or miss situation. Ones worth getting are the Ankylosaurus and Stegoceratops because we need more herbivores, this line suffers from theropod favoritism though. T. rex is boring and the Spinosaurus is very poor though.

blue2.) Electronics – Kinda reminded me of the JP3 Re-ak-atak assortment that’s been repainted a bazillion times, just with lights added. Scale is the problem here. Like the Dimorphodon won’t scale well if you got other Pterosaurs from JP/TLW/JP3 and even the Pteranodon in the Jurassic World Capture Vehicles assortment. Blue is a bit bigger than the TLW Electronic Raptor. I think these might be worth getting, they are kind of fun.

mosa3.) Capture Vehicles – MEH! I took a chance on these and I’m not satisfied with either one of the ones I got. Frankly I want to return them, but I had to mangle the package to get them out. So fat chance of getting a refund. I regret it, and didn’t really have the money for it, but did it anyways. The humans are tiny and have like 0 articulation to them. The head moves, arms and legs move together as one piece. The paint apps on the humans are complete and total garbage from the looks and are cheap. The Indominus’ Dino Damage is pretty sensitive, and don’t even get me started on the Pteranodon’s dino-damage. It’s a bit twitchy as well. Both vehicles are cheap. Actually, the gyrosphere is beyond cheap, the guy doesn’t even stay seated in it! The disc launcher does shoot surprisingly far though, but looks stupid. The only good thing about that set is the Indominus, but even that’s really cheaply made. If you think “I’ll just use my previous figures with the vehicles.” Hah no. Fat chance. Playability is decent, but everything else about them stinks. I might skip out on the Mosasaur, but that and the “Indominus Rex vs. Gyrosphere” were the only ones I wanted from this assortment. I took a chance on the Pteranodon one when I did it. Just a warning, photos and being in the package these things look good in store. I wouldn’t waste the 20 bucks on them.

chomprex4.) Chomping Rex – For it’s price and size (about the size of the JP3 Ultra Rex/JP Young T.rex) it’s not too bad, the play gimmick is a bit cheap with the mouth. It does not even close all the way and sometimes you have to assist it. It’s a good stand in for the large T.rex coming out this fall though. Personally I’ve had on my desk as a novelty item. I don’t think it’s worth the price though. It’s nice to have a female T.rex with a semi-accurate albeit simplified color scheme to what’s in the films.

5.) Bad Boy/Indominus Rex – This wasn’t so bad. Actually it’s probably the best of the line and I hope the large T.rex is good like this. You can see the coloration change ability in varying light levels, except in direct sunlight. No batteries included, but that’s okay. It’s probably the best money I have spent on a Jurassic Park figure in years with exception to the “Allosaurus Assault” and “Pachyrhinosaurus Clash” Dino Showdown sets of JP2k13, and the large Tyrannosaurus retool of the Bull from TLW from the JP2k9 line.

finalirexGeneral Thoughts: I think this line was over-hyped by the fandom and what not. People said these things are just like the Kenner days and frankly this is inaccurate and that’s an understatement. There’s some hits (electronics weren’t that bad, Large Indominus, two Basher/Biters maybe), but a lot of misses (The Vehicle versus packs especially). The question is up to you if you want to collect all of these or not. It’s changed my philosophy on being a completist when it comes to JP figures. The vehicles are the worst part, the paint apps there are cheap and the molding also is cheap. Those are like the equivalent of cheap dollar store toys, you guys know the type. Save your money, collect the big Indominus, Jada Toys, and the LEGOs.

Overall opinion: Feel free to develop your own here based on your own experiences, I’m just trying to save you some money in the long run. This line isn’t as good as JP/TLW’s lines, in fact it doesn’t even come close. There are some moments where it’s a bit better than JP3’s, but I actually overall will rate this line remarkably low because of how cheaply made it all looks when compared to the previous lines. Really the only high point are the electronic figures. I just did this because of my excitement for there being new merch/toys, which is reasonable. If not feeling somewhat misplaced and underwhelmed at the moment. I will say one thing it did get me back excited for Jurassic World, but the adrenaline rush of new merch does and will run out. Overall, I give this a D+ rating. I don’t rate these very high. JP3 line that we actually got repaints of countless times is bit better than these. I do hope the quality of the toys is not an indicative of the quality of the film.

Jurassic Park Encyclopedia Updates & More!

The Jurassic Park Encyclopedia and Jurassic Innards are now running on WordPress 4.1. New entries in the Jurassic Park Encyclopedia (Recent Entries on the right under Categories) will now show up on the JPLegacy Facebook and Twitter. Like, Follow, Share, Retweet & Comment on future Jurassic Park Encyclopedia Entries via Facebook and Twitter! With Jurassic World on the horizon, there will be planty of new entries. There are now 16 different “Share” buttons that show up under the entries and pages as well. Disambiguation Links have now been started, and will continue to be added until it is completely updated, as well as in any future entries that need them. Examples can be seen on Dr. Ian Malcolm at the top of the entries. With the new Ajaxy Live Search Bar, fully interlinked to the whole JPLegacy Network and Bing Translate, with 30 languages, the Jurassic Park Encyclopedia is more interactive for readers.

The Ajaxy Live Search Bar is also now up on Jurassic Innards too.

As was mentioned above, goes for the entire Jurassic Park Legacy Network. Every online presence is interlinked with all others, from Youtube to Twitter, DeviantArt to Google+. If you visit one, you can find the links / feeds / posts to all of the other JPLegacy Social Media outlets.

The Raptor Cursor seen on the Jurassic Park Encyclopedia, Jurassic Innards, and the Forums is now up and running on the main site jplegacy.org. Remember you need Chrome, Firefox, or Safari to see the cursor. Dennis Nedry when hovering over the search bar is still exclusive to the Jurassic Park Encyclopedia and Jurassic Innards. There are no cursor graphics for the Forum Theme: Playful Herbivores…yet.

Want to Volunteer? We need people. Apply in this thread!

Hey you! Wanna help share art? Have a look!

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Jurassic World Film: About Page

JPLegacy now has an ‘About’ page for the Jurassic World film. You can view the trailer in 1080p HD if you use the gear icon in the YouTube player. There is a list of all of the known actors and actresses playing roles in the film, each ones name is linked to their IMDB page. It will be updated as time unfolds the rest of the cast. Check it out here, and enjoy!

~JPLegacy Staff

Work Continuing on the Encyclopedia

Been a long time since we updated the blog about our work here at Jurassic Park Legacy. Rest assured we have all been diligently working on the encyclopedia project and filling it to the brim with all available information. The main thing we’ve been doing is pouring over the material and transcribing what we read and see. Our wealth of knowledge is growing with each entry we put into the encyclopedia and it’s truly remarkable. We’re 99% of the way through the novel-canon, 99% of the way through the film-canon (this is counting Rides, which is Alternate Universe and JP:TG which is nestled into the film-canon at this time), and 75% of the way through the comics (IDW is finished, Topps is being worked on and making good progress. Junior novels are in a preliminary stage still and the Trespasser canon articles still need some work as well. We’re also prepping for Phase 2 at this time of the encyclopedia with Behind the Scenes information as well about the production of the films. Some of those articles have been added or are currently being worked on at this time. The encyclopedia is a good way to learn about all things Jurassic Park and to help the fandom have the ultimate resource for all things Jurassic Park. Be sure to join today to help us out!

The Lost World Hypothesis: Part 3

This is the final installment of a multi-part entry into the process and pains of the creation of JPL’s map of Isla Sorna.  Eventually these entries will be merged into one article and made part of the Encyclopedia.


Jurassic Park III is, to put it simply, a cluster of plot holes and contradictions.  The most significant of these is the fact that Ben and Eric para sail into the island.  Then Ben’s body is found (still attached to the para sailing harness and hanging from the tree he landed in) in the center of the island.  If anyone can explain how Ben was able to reach the center of the island from an initial gliding height of only a few hundred feet, well we would love to hear it.  Then there’s the fact that (based on not only the actual location used for filming but also a quick shot in the film itself) the landing strip is actually less than a mile from the coast.  You know; the coast that Alan Grant was so intent on everyone getting to quickly?  Yeah.  They walked in the opposite direction of that coast.

And of course in The Lost World: Jurassic Park we are told time and time again that the coast is relatively safe and devoid of carnivores, yet in Jurassic Park III Eric insists that “the closer you get to water the bigger things get.”  Granted Brachiosaurus is both an herbivore and one of the largest things on the island, but by Eric’s tone he seems to be referring to dangerous carnivores.

If I seem bitter, well it’s because I am.

But nevertheless, some sort of map had to be drawn for the film, so we did our best to make a map that made sense.  Unfortunately, this meant either taking out specific “in film evidence” (which we did not want to do) or breaking any sense of reality that the film tries to hold on to (which was an even worse proposition).  Thus, on our map Ben and Eric para sail for approximately five miles before finally landing (perhaps they caught an updraft?) and the landing strip is not situated next to the coast (though we did attempt to put it near a water source, partly because a mile-long runway wouldn’t fit anywhere else).  For its credit there are certain parts of the film, such as the location where the plane holding Alan and the Kirbys enters, which flow together well on the map.  However these are few and far between.

Some discrepancy exists in reference to the large rocks seen in the opening shot.  Once believed to be either of the two large outcroppings seen on the map it was eventually realized that the rocks in the film are much smaller, on the order of a few pixels wide on the scale we were working with.  Because of this it was decided that the props crew likely wouldn’t have bothered to place these rocks on the map, since they are not large enough to represent a topographical feature.


The film opens with the Dino-Soar boat on the western-side of the island, traveling around the coast clockwise.  Eventually they release Ben and Eric on their para sail and travel into a fog.  During this time the boat is attacked by an unseen animal, killing both captains and leaving Ben and Eric to crash into a small reef or outcropping.  Hoping not to crash (which would send their para sail straight into the water) Ben unhooks Eric and himself from the boat and steers the para sail toward the nearest dry land; Isla Sorna.  They slip between some mountains and begin heading inland, catching an updraft or two before finally crashing in a group of trees just a few hundred feet from a raptor nesting area (Velociraptor “antirrhopus sornaensis”).  Eric is able to land relatively safely and turn off the camera just before the raptors attack, driving Eric away and killing Ben.  Eric eventually makes home base a few miles away in an abandoned water truck.

The rocks visible in the opening shot of Jurassic Park III.

The Dino-Soar boat as it travels in a clockwise direction around the island. To the left is the same mountain that Ben and Eric later glide behind.

Eight weeks later Paul and Amanda Kirby have come together to search for their son, lying to and kidnapping Dr. Alan Grant and his assistant Billy Brennan.  The plane they have chartered approaches Isla Sorna from the north.  The path the plane takes would actually have taken them straight past the western coast; however the plane makes a sharp turn left (toward the east) and enters the island from the same location as the first shot of the film.  The plane travels further inland until eventually turning left around a mountain and heading north above an open plain.  Nash spots a landing strip ahead and to the left of the plane.  After Grant is knocked out by Cooper the plane circles the island before coming to land at Site B’s landing strip.

The chartered plane as it turns left (to the east) toward the island's western coast. Note the valley directly to the plane's left; this is where it enters (and the first shot of the island in the film).

The plane as it passes by the large rocks on its way into the island. Note that while large in relation to a plane they are not on the order of "miles wide."

The plane as it turns left (toward the north) around a mountain side.

After the Spinosaurus attack the plane is left crashed a couple hundred feet or more from the landing strip.  Grant decides that the group must head for the coast to find rescue, leading the survivors southeast, away from the large Spinosaurus.  After walking for a few miles they encounter the downed para sail and simultaneously discover Ben’s corpse and the nearby raptor nest.  They leave the area quickly, continuing east, while Billy takes the time to steal eggs from the nest.

The survivors stumble upon the para sail and thus the site of Ben's death. The raptor nest is a short walking distance from here.

Eventually they discover the Embryonics Administration building nestled in a valley below them and head into the building, entering through the main entrance from the northwest.  After being attacked by the lone sornaensis male they exit the building from the same location turning south/southeastward, quickly stumbling upon a herd of Parasaurolophus and Corythosaurus.

View from a higher elevation of the Embryonics Administration and Labs. The labs are confined to this valley, and based on this the survivors would approach the entrance from the left.

The survivors run from the Embryonics Administration building, exiting back out the front and turning left after exiting (the opposite direction from how they entered).

In the confusion Alan is separated from the rest of the group and is found by Eric, who leads him back to the water truck where the two spend the night.  Billy, Paul, and Amanda spend the night high in the trees.  Come morning both groups set out.  Alan and Eric eventually find the ravine, at the bottom of which is a river and a salvageable boat.  The other group continues in the same general direction.  Eventually both groups converge on either side of a perimeter fence, likely having passed on either side when the groups split up.  After escaping the Spinosaurus again they head into the Aviary.

Alan and Eric turning away from the canyon, below which is the river, the barge, and (out of frame to the far left) the Aviary.

They escape the Aviary to the south, coming out next to the barge seen earlier by Alan and Eric, and travel south along the slow-moving river.  Sometime during the next night they are attacked by the Spinosaurus a second time about a mile from the mouth of the river and spend the next few hours waiting for morning.  They travel south toward the coast when they are ambushed by the raptors just out of sight of the beach (perhaps having been following the survivors on the water).  Scared off by the approaching helicopters the raptors flee, leaving the survivors to quickly reach the beach and safety.  They then traveled south in helicopters to rendezvous with a group of ships.


How Billy was found (and is somehow not dead) is a matter of extreme plot armor; likely the armed forces in question spotted him floating in the water half-dead or washed up on shore near the mouth of the river.  Billy probably floated “safely” on the river after passing under the Aviary walls, actually behind the barge that Alan and the others were traveling on.  After the spino attack he would have drifted straight past the other survivors as they waited for morning, thus reaching the coast before them.

So now the fandom has a map to follow.  Again, most of these locations are approximations and may not be 100% accurate, but then neither are the films in what they are trying to tell us.  Though we feel this is, in essence, “as close as we’re going to get,” I would personally like to take this opportunity to remind people that science is constantly evolving and being altered.  If you think you have something to provide to the map (such as new information or a theory about some matter) do not hesitate to contact me (T-Rex_Master) on the forums through private message about it.  I’ll be happy to look into it.

Hopefully Jurassic Park 4, whenever it happens, blends seamlessly into the rest of the map.  We can only hope.

Jurassic Park Legacy's (as of 9/3/11) map of Isla Sorna, aka "Site B."

The Lost World Hypothesis: Part 2

This is Part 2 of a multi-part entry into the process and pains of the creation of JPL’s map of Isla Sorna.  Eventually these entries will be merged into one article and made part of the Encyclopedia.


Determining the specific locations for various events was a complicated task.  There was no existing map to draw reference from, and so any clue as to the location of, say, the high hide was hidden within the film.  We were required to look at dialogue exchange and the physical features of the island as a primary source.  In situations where that did not provide enough of a framework, such as the exact location of the trailers, logic and deductive reasoning were required in order to eliminate other potential locations.

The most sound method was to refer to specific dialogue or plot elements for clues, then fall back on features of the landscape, and then finally determine any other elements to come to a conclusion.  Going over each and every point of reference in this article would be tedious, to say the least.  However, you can get an idea for the process if we look at the location of the Operations Center (sometimes referred to as the worker’s village) and why we put it where we did.

Let’s look at the evidence.  The location of the village was stated to be in the center of the island.  We also have Roland’s comment to Ian and Ajay during the night (after Roland returns from finding Dater’s body, and just before the two rexes attack) that “the Operation’s Building is right down in there, about a mile and a half from the base of these cliffs.”  This gives us three frames of reference; the village is in the middle of the island, is at a low elevation change (they have to go down cliffs to reach it), and is approximately a mile and a half away from the cliff side or ridge (this also gives us a clue as to where the temporary camp is located, but we will come to that later).  A fourth piece of evidence comes in the form of the Velociraptors, which seem to be stationed in droves around the village.  Combine that with Ludlow’s comment about the group having to worry about Velociraptors and we are led to the conclusion that the village lies near the raptor territory as seen on Hammond’s computer near the beginning of the film.

Now that all of this evidence is compiled we can turn to the map, looking specifically at the area in the center of the island near the Velociraptors.  From there we look for a lowland area with a positive change in elevation and see if we can put the village about 1.5 miles from that cliff side.  Working with the map we are able to put in place an “approximate location.”  It is important to note that sometimes locations would be changed as other factors became apparent, or new information was brought to light.  The location of the game trail, for example, changed considerably during our analysis from the middle of the island down to the south to then up to the north.

Based upon film evidence and working with the map we believe that the events unfolded as such.


The Mar Del Plata, the boat hired by Hammond’s team, approaches the island from the north.  It heads south along the eastern coast of Sorna before landing in a lagoon.  After unloading the vehicles Hammond’s team heads north, following a dirt road toward the location where (presumably) Sarah should be located.  They park the trailers near a set of cliffs in the northern-most area of the island and power on their GPS units, heading back south to rendezvous with Sarah.

After finding her and heading back north towards camp they discover that Kelly has stowed aboard the trailers (it is by now getting close to “dinner time”).  Within minutes they watch Ludlow’s team (“the hunters”) as they approach from the north and head along the eastern coast of Sorna, soon landing a few miles south of the trailers on a game trail.  Hammond’s team jumps in their Jeeps to follow the helicopters and survey the hunters.

Ludlow's Team approaching from the north.

The hunters travel westward along the game trail, into the setting sun.  Roland and Ajay, during a break, discover a set of Tyrannosaurus footprints disappearing into the jungle toward the southwest.  The rest of the hunter team continues their work while Roland and Ajay track the footprints back to the Rex Nest, about five miles to the southwest.  They return with the infant by nightfall.  The hunters, heeding Roland’s earlier advice, make camp off the game trail (unbeknownst to them just a mile or two from the trailers).  Roland and Ajay set up their hunting blind nearby.

Roland and the rest of the hunters drive into the setting sun during the roundup scene.

A view of the coast from Hammond's team's scouting location, showing the ocean behind the game trail.

With light filtering in through the trees Roland and Ajay have reach the rex nest before nightfall.

By the time Nick and Sarah begin their sabotage of the hunter camp “mommy and daddy” have already discovered that their infant is missing and are heading north while Ian, Kelly, and Eddie head back to the trailers.  Eddie begins setting up the high hide.

Eventually Roland and the other hunters realize they have company on the island and head north along the dirt road, hoping to find the other humans.  Sarah and Nick work on setting the infant rex’s leg as the adults get closer, passing under the high hide and likely passing the hunters as well (who hide, of course).  Eventually they reach the trailers and, after getting their infant back, push the trailers over the cliff.  Eddie leaves Kelly in the high hide and takes the Jeep to help; not long afterwords the hunters reach Kelly and bring her along with them (likely thinking her safer with a group of guys holding big guns).  Soon the adults return to kill Eddie, then leave again.  The hunters finally reach the trailer site, just in time to help the remains of Hammond’s team to safety.  All the survivors together then regroup back at the destroyed hunter camp.

The survivors return to the hunter camp to regroup, salvage equipment, discuss their options, and just generally argue.

After arguing and much deliberation it is agreed that the survivors will travel to the Operations Center in the workers village, Ludlow citing this trip to take “a day’s walk, maybe more.”  They head south before dawn breaks, eventually passing by the coast in the wee hours of the morning.  They are soon set upon by a shower which passes quickly.  Sometime in the second half of the trek they are forced to walk north around a set of intertwining mountain ranges, doubling their travel time (where otherwise they would have headed due west and made the trip in about 10 hours), and pass near the location of Cathy’s beach (the beach where Cathy, the young girl, was attacked by Compsognathus at the beginning of the film).  This is indicated by identical mountain ranges in the backgrounds of both shots.  Here they hear the distant roar of a Tyrannosaurus, likely one of the adults following the scent of blood on Sarah’s jacket.

Cathy Bowman as she encounters the first Compsognathus. Note the mountain range in the top left corner of the image.

The same mountain range as above, behind the survivors, as they continue their trek to the Operations Center.

In the late afternoon Roland stops the group just a few miles short of the village, checking on Sarah’s health.  Dieter takes the time to relieve himself but is frightened by a compy and takes a tumble, injuring himself.  He is soon killed a distance away from the rest of the survivors, whom start start moving again.  About 15 minutes later they realize Dieter is missing.  Roland tells the rest of the group to continue on, as they are “ten minutes” away from the ridge where they will take a few hours rest.  He and a small group of hunters head back to find Dieter.

Roland and the others eventually rendezvous with the rest of the survivors at the ridge some time in the night.  Roland implies he had taken a detour close to the village before returning back (“I’ve seen it”) and comments that in one hour they will make the final stretch to the village, “about a mile and a half from the base of [the] cliffs.”  At this point the adult rexes have caught up to the survivors and attack them, actually pushing everyone toward the village.  The survivors of the rex attack wade through raptor territory in the long grass.  Few survive.  Ian, Nick, Sarah, and Kelly make it through the grass and fall down a short incline to come level with the village.  Nick runs ahead to the Operations Center to call for help, eventually being joined by the others after the raptors attack in the village.  They all get flown to safety.  Back at the ridge Roland has captured the male rex and eventually also gets flown to safety with the rest of InGen’s workers.


Admittedly the only snag in this line of reasoning is the location of the rex nest, which is not in the same location as Hammond’s thermal scans show back in his bedroom.  However, this is one of the situations where film evidence begins to contradict itself.  Factually, there is no way that Roland and Ajay could have made it to the rex nest from the game trail in the amount of time they had were that nest in the location that Hammond’s computer suggests; it was too late in the day for a trek of that length.  Moving the game trail inland would not work to correct this imbalance as film evidence shows the game trail running along the coast.  Thus, in the interest of creating a map that doesn’t involve random teleportation of the protagonists we decided that Hammond’s map is either not showing nesting sites, is blatantly wrong, or there is more than one rex family on Sorna.  The latter is actually a fair assumption, since a viable population would have to include more than a single mated pair and their one offspring.

Hammond's computer indicates rex territory somewhere in the middle of the island. Either this is simply a "current position" marker or another rex family's territory, since Roland and Ajay could never have made it to this location before nightfall.

Contradictions make the process difficult, though not impossible; not until Jurassic Park III anyway.


Continued in Part 3…

The Lost World Hypothesis: Part 1

This is Part 1 of a multi-part entry into the process and pains of the creation of JPL’s map of Isla Sorna.  Eventually these entries will be merged into one article and made part of the Encyclopedia.


Jurassic Park Legacy’s map of Isla Sorna (aka Site B) has been a many-years long endeavor.  Numerous maps of Isla Sorna exist, both in-film props and real world publicity items.  One would therefore think that it would be a simple thing to create a map corresponding to the films’ events.

However, none of the maps work together, and topography varies from one map to another.  It seems the production team for the films did not have any sort of concrete map or topography from which they were working from.

This leaves JPL’s Map Team with a dilemma.  Which of these many maps should be used as the de facto topography for our map?  Should we rule out every other map or attempt to merge all the maps together?  Should one map be considered more likely to be “accurate” than all the others?

After a lot of deliberation it was agreed that the map seen in The Lost World: Jurassic Park during Kelly’s wandering of the trailers (below) was the most accurate for our purposes.  The topography is clear, the map is given a central focus in the film (even if only for a few seconds), and within the film universe itself it appears to be a detailed map of the variety you would find pinned in a government building.

The Five Deaths

Las Cinco Muertas, The Lost World: Jurassic Park

So our topography was established; now we had to determine the size of the island.  This was done fairly easily.  Costa Rica appears on this map as well, and sizing it appropriately allowed us to determine the size of Sorna.  The result;  approximately 21 x 20 miles.

The island was now complete.  We created a large topographical map of the entire Las Cinco Muertes island chain and created a map scale from there (at our scale; 116 pixels per mile).  Work on actual locations could now finally begin.


Continued in Part 2…

Why science outweighs want…

People have a hard time with the idea of scientific fact and what it means to change an idea over time. Take the public conception of dinosaurs over the last hundred years. Dinosauria was a new thing in the early 1800s, but bones had been found previously of “dragons” and “other beasts” for a long, long time. People get upset with the aspect that Dragons and Monsters aren’t real, but established folklore that is nothing more than passed between cultures over time. Science? Disproved it and pointed out what it really was, yet some people still sit there believing what they will believe.

Science should always outweigh want though especially when it comes to belief that is unsupported by fact. With science you start with a hypothesis to test and if it’s proven wrong after multiple experiments? You’re wrong and you move on gaining knowledge from the experience and sharing with others until you form another hypothesis and guess what? You repeat the process. If you get the answer you were hoping for? You turn around and still publish your results and see if others discover the same thing you have in your experiment. So what does this have to do with fossils and dinosaurs? Paleontologists have found fossil evidence of feathers, protofeathers, and the like in Theropod Dinosaurs. A lot of people can’t stand the idea of Dromaesaurids (Velociraptor and kin) being feathered. Either they feel it makes the animal look ridiculous or they just love the idea of the scaly reptiles running around clawing at one another. Now the thing that bothers me is that some blame Jurassic Park for this. While it may have been contributory to the “Scaly Dinosaur” group it is clearly not to blame. Jurassic Park only represented one interpretation at that time throw in the fact there’s numerous other Dinosaur fiction out there where feathered dinosaurs are clearly not featured. Why? Public perception. Feathered dinosaurs in 1992? That was a new thing, a new concept that was radical, but not unheard of at all in the slightest. The issue was as always public perception. The public wants to picture scaly horizontally bipedal animals fighting and doing monstrous things and not picture dinosaurs as they were. Why? They find it enthralling and exciting no matter how truly wrong it is. As time went on and more evidence was found the idea of feathered Theropods was more widely accepted. It cemented the relationship between dinosaurs and birds to a heavy degree. The idea of birds being members of Dinosauria itself is fairly new also, but it has older roots back in the early days of paleontology. You can thank the Dinosaur Renaissance for these old ideas being brought back to life in a manner of speaking. An old idea becoming new is not unheard of, but the essential problem is people wanted to believe different (that dinosaurs were sluggish elephantine animals), ignored the evidence (Archeaopteryx!) and it interfered (the public uses terms like dinosaur now to indicate lesser intelligence or something that’s lived past its prime).

I make “want” sound like a bad thing, and the fact is it can be a good thing also. All ideas start by want, but in the end? Science prevails. The key is being objective and that’s what a lot of people fail to realize with want. I see this a lot nowadays with people complaining about the lack of feathered theropods in Jurassic Park. Truth be told Jurassic Park, and InGen’s scientists at the time, worked off public perception of the animals to genetically recreate their theme park “dinosaurs”. Some say “Well this makes them not dinosaurs.” No. It does as they originate from dinosaur blood. They’re dinosaurs in their own right, just the interpretation is different and while the evidence of quill knobs is possible in Velociraptor (the real life one – not the Deinonychus counterpart you see in JP) it’s also equally possible in other animals related to Velociraptor. So the point is InGen, in the films and novels, can alter DNA and produce the animals how they see fit. This would mean genetic technology is a lot more advanced in say the Jurassic Park universes than our own. Of course I admit my ignorance on the subject of genetic technology in our own and that we may be advance, but there’s looser morals associated with the use of it in the Jurassic Park film and novel storylines.

Now on the flip side there are people who are also upset with the aspect of feathered dinosaurs being included possibly in the future of the films. They think this contradicts pre-established canon and to this I point out – again – this is theoretically possible as InGen treated their dinosaurs like software. Each animal to be manipulated in such a way for the “theme park setting” more or less.

So should we have feathered theropods for JPIV? Yes. But explain it to the public because people need to understand WHY and that was the biggest problem with the Jurassic Park /// “Velociraptors”.

A Fandom In Peril?

Being around the community for the last ten years I’ve noticed a fair majority of the older fans disappear from the community after getting older. It seems to be something people they just get tired of being here, and who can blame them in all honesty with the way things genuinely go for the film series. It’s been at least nearly ten-eleven years without a film and one is going to possibly occur in two to three years given Spielberg’s recent statements are Comic-con.

I can honestly say I’ve left two to three times I can offhand remember and still find myself back here in the community. I’ve often wondered if this just has something to do with “well, I got to get on with life” kind of thing that causes these disappearances for some or if it’s just a genuine “all abandon hope” sorts of disappearances. I’ve been a member of the community close to eleven years at this point. I found InGenNET (an old JP site) in about December of 1999 and didn’t began to post actively on it as of January of 2000. It wasn’t long after that I began interacting in a way I never thought I’d imagine as a Forum Moderator then eventually, as time went on, a Co-Webmaster rank on the site of trying to run it all in Neo_Maze’s absence. I loved inGenNET the truth is, but not everybody’s passion seemed to be in it. Due to a culminations of philosophical points, apathy on the webmaster’s behalf (I’ve presumed), and a poor web host inGenNET died officially in 2001. Many attempts have been made to revive it and all were unsuccessful because other greater – and better – sites filled the void.

I had a couple offers after my departure to come and work with JPAftermath.Net when it was ran by Steve before eventually settling down with JPDb for a long term 3 year tenure. Once again differences of opinion and direction left me just desiring to make my own website finally and thus JPLegacy was born. As you can tell though a lot of the people I used to speak to are relatively not here anymore because they’ve moved on to greater/bigger things. The community has this desire and sad tendency to bring notification – continually – of circumstances they could work on changing, but won’t either due to narrowed-viewpoints or just apathy itself. I say this to highlight the people that have made a positive change for the community. I can say at least a majority of the staff on the site, even the ones that have left for bigger, better things, made a positive contribution to other fans to inspire them. This ranges from the work with the Encyclopedia, which spawned not only this site but the Film Canon Mod Project, the Novel Canon mod project, Live the Legend RPG, on down to our growing costuming department. The thing with JPL is we hope to inspire others to do great things with their fandom here and maybe professionally some day in life when moving onto greater things. Unfortunately though we see a lot of people leaving Jurassic Park behind with that. The films are great, the novel is better, and the other stuff – let’s hope it gets better there.

So what can we do to keep us around after a fourth film has came and went? Undoubtedly people will leave again. It’s a point of fact in this community is the turn-over rate is sadly high, but there’s some possibility with that maybe JP fans will stay this time. Most websites themselves are not always an accurate representative of true counts of fandom though, but things are done on websites to bring attention to the fandom. The fact is if everybody cares about Jurassic Park and in order to keep the fandom from going extinct every one has to work to make the fandom known and contribute in some fashion.